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Gym Pet Peeves

I notice a lot of things in the gym that make me wonder what the heck people are doing, how they are not injuring themselves, and if they really expect to get fit with poor exercise choices.  Sometimes I think that we as a society have become clueless about physical culture.  Then I see a few people who look like they are training smart, and my faith in humanity is restored.  On the other hand, there are still those irritating things in the gym that annoy me.  Here are a few of them:

The $50 home gym

I recently read a post on Gimundo about building a $50 home gym, which I found to be.... well, utter crap. I guess the suggestions are ok for someone looking to just start moving, but I personally can't imagine anyone achieving anything beyond mediocre fitness with a suggestion of exercise videos, balance ball, and 3 lb hand weights (really, 3lbs?!? Are we so weak that we shoot for weights lighter than some of my textbooks?). Here's what I suggest for a $50 home gym.

Let’s Get Physical

With the New Year right around the corner, there will be plenty of resolutions to get in shape or to drop a few pounds in 2011.  If history is any indicator, a  lot of that resolve will disappear within weeks and it will be another year of failed resolutions.  To be fair, modern life does not exactly make it easy to meet th

Standardizing

In my continuing quest to simplify my life, I've started standardizing some things in my life. Part of that has been about developing routines to simplify my day-to-day life, although that's not really different than how I normally operate. Everyone will develop daily routines to efficiently get through mundane tasks and move on to dealing with the rest of the day. Mostly though, I've been moving towards standardizing my possessions and things I need to use.

Lessons from Fist of the North Star, part II

I am now nearly 60 episodes into Fist of the North Star. That comes out to about 40 episodes watched in the past 3 weeks, only two of which I've actively watched the series. Hey, what can I say? When your wife is off traveling to foreign lands, you have a lot more free time living a bachelor life. Anyhow, I've picked up some new lessons hidden in the plot of FOTNS. I'm still really enjoying watching Kenshiro kick ass, but these little points stuck out for me:

Jump rope notes: Buddy Lee replacement cords and cable rope

Replacing my Buddy Lee rope cord

I finally managed to snap the cord on my Buddy Lee rope. It took me about three years, but I finally wore through the cord. All things considered, that's not too bad. I chew through the cheap ropes when I get in a jump rope conditioning phase, though I guess I mostly break those ropes at the handles.

What motivates you?

In the capitalistic model, it's money. But we all know (hopefully we all know) that money isn't everything. So, then what does motivate us? I thought this video had an interesting answer:

Lessons from Fist of the North Star

I've recently started watching Fist of the North Star since I've discovered the Hulu has the complete series. I had watched the animated movie in college, but I never saw the t.v. series. I'm around 17 episodes into the 152 episode series, and I must say I am enjoying it (1980's graphics and all). But I am glad that I didn't watch the series as a kid. While it is technically a cartoon, I'm not entirely sure my 7-year old self would have been quite ready for all the animated gore. I also think that the cartoon quirks may have taught me some erroneous lessons.

Weight bearing exercise

Conventional wisdom tells us that weight training increases bone density (ex. here and here). The force of your muscles moving a load stresses the bones slightly and causes them to grow back stronger. That's a decidedly good thing, at least assuming that you don't do anything really (excuse the pun) bone-headed like lift weights you're not ready for or do exercises with terrible technique.

Weight training and bone density

Conventional wisdom tells us that weight training increases bone density (ex. here and here). The force of your muscles moving a load stresses the bones slightly and causes them to grow back stronger. That's a decidedly good thing, at least assuming that you don't do anything really (excuse the pun) bone-headed like lift weights you're not ready for or do exercises with terrible technique.

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